NextWave Radio Hour 1/26/23: Making the World Better

Producer/Host: Pepin Mittelhauser (he/him)
Theme music by Zeke Sacaridiz. All other music is royalty free.This project was made possible by the generous support of the Maine Community Foundation.

NextWave Radio Hour is a new program featuring folks in their 20s and 30s, often referred to as Millennials, from all across Maine. In this program, host Pepin Mittelhauser will be discussing issues, news, and current events both locally and nationally, and featuring young creators who trailblaze their own paths in our modern political, economic, and social climate. We hope to provide unique perspectives of life from the next generation working to create the future they hope to lead.

This month:
-Working to make the world a better place for everyone
-Being queer in Maine
-Creating the life that suites you best

“The Waggle” and “Metamorphosis” by Bee Parks and the Hornets used with permission.

Guests:
Bethany Humphrey
Nina Duggan, Healthy Acadia, Maine Transnet, Downeast Rainbow Alliance, Curbside Queens
Brittany Parker, Bee Parks and the Hornets

About the host:
Pepin Mittelhauser (he/him) is the Digital Media Associate to WERU Community Radio, and an avid gardener and farmer, musician and singer, and lover of nature and the outdoors. He graduated from College of the Atlantic in ’19 with focuses in sustainable agriculture, food systems, and live and recorded audio engineering and production.

The Essential Rhythm 1/29/23: The Origins of Mucus

Producer/Host: Sarah O’Malley

This episode discusses the origins of mucus in early animal lineages, including Cnidaria and Ctenophora, and highlights the lack of mucus in another early animal lineage, Porifera (sponges). Scientists hypothesize that the invention of mucus was a major event that enabled the evolution of true tissues, as well as serving as the front line of the immune system, separating microbes from vulnerable tissue, in all animals from Cnidarians to ourselves.

About the host:
Sarah O’Malley is an ecologist, naturalist and science communicator passionate about deepening her listeners’ experiences with the natural world. She teaches biology and sustainability at Maine Maritime Academy and is currently collaborating on a guide book to the intertidal zone in the Gulf of Maine.

The Nature of Phenology 1/28/23: Brown creepers

Producers: Hazel Stark & Joe Horn
Host: Hazel Stark

The coloration and size of these little birds camouflages them incredibly well against the tree bark where they spend most of their time. But even if you can’t spot one close up due to this camouflage, their behavior easily reveals their identity.
Photos, a full transcript, references, contact information, and more available at thenatureofphenology.wordpress.com

About the host/writers:
Joe Horn lives in Gouldsboro, is Co-Founder of Maine Outdoor School, L3C, and is a Registered Maine Guide and Carpenter. He is passionate about fishing, cooking, and making things with his hands. He has both an MBA in Sustainability and an MS focused in Environmental Education. Joe can be reached by emailing [email protected]

Hazel Stark lives in Gouldsboro, is Co-Founder and Naturalist Educator at Maine Outdoor School, L3C, and is a Registered Maine Guide. She loves taking a closer look at nature through the lens of her camera, napping in beds of moss, and taking hikes to high points to see what being tall is all about. She has an MS in Resource Management and Conservation and is a lifelong Maine outdoorswoman. Hazel can be reached by emailing [email protected]

The Cosmic Curator 1/28/23

This is your Cosmic Curator, Tom Yaroschuk, with a look at thestars for today January 28 th .
If I told you once, I’ve told you 100 times on this segment, The moon’s transits across the zodiac sets the emotional thermostat.
Today, well, its going to be pretty hot, emotionally…

About the Host:
Tom Yaroschuk is a Vedic Astrologer. His intention is to help people understand their karma and the issues they may confront to cultivate more fulfilling lives. Tom is writing a memoir of the spiritual lessons derived from his work in a Homeless Day Center in between a career as an award winning television and documentary producer.

Earthwise 1/28/23: The Element of Smoke

Producer/Host: Anu Dudley

About the host:

Rev. Dr. Anu Dudley is an ordained Pagan minister and a retired history professor. She continues to teach classes, including the three-year ordination curriculum at the Temple of the Feminine Divine, and others such as History of the Goddess, Paganism 101, Ethical Magic, and Introduction to the Runes. Currently she is writing a book about how to cast the runes using their original Goddess meanings. She lives in the woods off-grid in a small homesteading community in Central Maine.

Coastal Conversations 1/27/23: Gouldsboro, Maine

Producer/Host: Natalie Springuel

Coastal Conversations: Conversations with people who live, work, and play on the Maine coast, hosted by the University of Maine Sea Grant Program.

This month:
This episode features two distinct stories about Gouldsboro, Maine:

STORY 1: Gouldsboro, a working waterfront community at a crossroads
Today’s show features the second episode of this year’s From the Sea Up podcast series focused on Maine’s working waterfront towns. We’ll be headed to Gouldsboro, A historic fishing town with over 50 miles of coastline. In 2020, the Norwegian-backed company American Aquafarms proposed putting two closed-pen salmon farms, totaling 120-acres, in Frenchman Bay between Gouldsboro and Bar Harbor. Although American Aquafarm’s initial application for an aquaculture lease was terminated by the Maine Department of Marine Resources in the spring of 2022, a question about the future of Maine’s waters took hold in many rural coastal communities.
In this episode, From the Sea Up producers visit South Gouldsboro, a small and active working waterfront with stunning views of Cadillac Mountain and the proposed lease site. With perspectives from a seaweed farmer and cultivator, Sarah Redmond, as well as Jerry Potter, a longtime lobsterman, and Sebastian Belle from the Maine Aquaculture Association, this episode explores the identity and needs of one working waterfront community, and asks the question: What kind of working waterfront do people want to see here in the future? And what role does aquaculture play in that future?
This story is brought to you by our radio storytelling friend Galen Koch, whose podcast series, From the Sea Up, has been featured on Coastal Conversations before. Galen brings the past and present together to help us make sense of Maine’s complicated future. This is the second in a working waterfront series we will keep sharing over the next few months.

STORY 2: Gouldsboro: a legacy of sardines
You heard the narrator in our first story talk about American Aquafarms’ purchase of the Maine Fair Trade lobster processing facility in the Gouldsboro village of Prospect Harbor. While American Aquafarms’ intention is to someday convert the lobster processing operation into a salmon processing facility and hatchery, this plant was in the business of packing sardines for nearly 100 years. As the era of Maine’s sardine industry was coming to an end in the later part of the 20th century, and sardine packing plants were closing one by one up and down the Maine coast, the Stinson’s Sardine Cannery was the very last hold out. It’s final owner, Bumble Bee Foods, shuttered the sardine operation for good in 2010, making it not only the last sardine cannery in Maine, but the very last sardine cannery in the whole of the United States.

In 2011, the year after the sardine plant closed, oral historians from “Oral History and Folklife Research, Inc” sought to honor and document the Stinson Sardine Factory legacy by interviewing a number of former employees. In our second story today, we share some clips from two of these interviews with women who worked as sardine packers.

Guest/s:

STORY 1
Sarah Redmond, Springtide Seaweed
Jerry Potter, lobsterman
Sebastian Belle, Maine Aquaculture Association

STORY 2
We’ll hear a short clip from the interview with Arlene Hartford, followed by a slightly longer clip from the interview with Lela Anderson. Both women were interviewed by Keith Ludden in 2011 and the full collection is available here

Other credits:
STORY 1
From the Sea Up is made possible by the Fund for Maine Islands through a partnership between Island Institute, College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, and the First Coast. Click here to hear past episodes and for more information

STORY 2
Thanks to the folks at “Oral History and Folklife Research, Inc” for permission to air these clips. You can access their full collections here. And thanks also to production assistant Camden Hunt, for helping edit the audio clips for this segment of today’s show. If you want to hear more about sardines, check out the Coastal Conversations for our August 28, 2020 episode called “Stories of the Sardine Industry” which features these clips and many more

About the host:

Natalie Springuel has hosted Coastal Conversation’s since 2015, with support from the University of Maine Sea Grant where she has served as a marine extension associate for 20 years. In 2019, Springuel received an award for Public Affairs programming from the Maine Association of Broadcasters for the Coastal Conversations show called “Portland’s Working Waterfront.” Springuel is passionate about translating science, sharing stories, and offering a platform for multiple voices to weigh in on complex coastal and ocean issues. She has recently enrolled in audio production training at Maine Media Workshop to dive deeper into making great community radio.

NextWave Radio Hour 1/26/23: Being Queer in Maine

Producer/Host: Pepin Mittelhauser (he/him)
Theme music by Zeke Sacaridiz. “Schmelzer’s Chaconne” is by J. H. Schmelzer, and performed by Phoebe Durand-McDonnell, baroque triple harp, and Alonzo Esteban Cárdenas Muñoz, theorbo. (link to the YouTube video here) All other music is royalty free.This project was made possible by the generous support of the Maine Community Foundation.

NextWave Radio Hour is a new program featuring folks in their 20s and 30s, often referred to as Millennials, from all across Maine. In this program, host Pepin Mittelhauser will be discussing issues, news, and current events both locally and nationally, and featuring young creators who trailblaze their own paths in our modern political, economic, and social climate. We hope to provide unique perspectives of life from the next generation working to create the future they hope to lead.

This month:
-Working to make the world a better place for everyone
-Being queer in Maine
-Creating the life that suites you best

“The Waggle” and “Metamorphosis” by Bee Parks and the Hornets used with permission.

Guests:
Bethany Humphrey
Nina Duggan, Healthy Acadia, Maine Transnet, Downeast Rainbow Alliance, Curbside Queens
Brittany Parker, Bee Parks and the Hornets

About the host:
Pepin Mittelhauser (he/him) is the Digital Media Associate to WERU Community Radio, and an avid gardener and farmer, musician and singer, and lover of nature and the outdoors. He graduated from College of the Atlantic in ’19 with focuses in sustainable agriculture, food systems, and live and recorded audio engineering and production.

Around Town 1/26/23: Maine Girls of STEM

Producer/Host: Amy Browne

This week: The Challenger Learning Center of Maine and Maine Maritime Academy are partnering together to celebrate International Day of Women and Girls in Science, February 11, 2023 with Maine Girls of STEM Kirsten Hibbard, Executive Director, Challenger Learning Center of Maine joins us with all the details

FMI: www.astronaut.org/maine-girls-of-stem/ [email protected], 207-990-2900 ext.1

About the host:
Amy Browne started out at WERU as a volunteer news & public affairs producer in 2000, co-hosting/co-producing RadioActive with Meredith DeFrancesco. She joined the team of Voices producers a few years later, and has been WERU’s News & Public Affairs Manager since January, 2006. In addition to RadioActive, Voices, Maine Currents and Maine: The Way Life Could Be, Amy also produced and hosted the WERU News Report for several years. She has produced segments for national programs including Free Speech Radio News, This Way Out, Making Contact, Workers Independent News, Pacifica PeaceWatch, and Live Wire News, and has contributed to Democracy Now and the WBAI News Report. She is the recipient of the 2014 Excellence in Environmental Journalism Award from the Sierra Club of Maine, and Maine Association of Broadcasters awards for her work in 2017 and 2021.