Talk of the Towns 7/14/21: The Challenge of Workforce Housing

Producer/Host: Ron Beard

What is the brief history of your organization’s work on affordable workforce housing in your community? What led to its creation? How did you decide to frame the issue for your situation?

Where did you find inspiration, including other community examples (Martha’s Vineyard, elsewhere?)

What approaches have most resonated with people in your community? What strategies have you tried and what has worked well?

How have you approached the question of keeping housing that you designate/support as affordable into the future? (covenants, etc.)

How have you engaged local government, lending agencies?

How is your work funded?

Share some vignettes about the families who have benefited from your work? How do they fit into the workforce and as community members?

What are the challenges that you have faced in getting the community to support your efforts? Are their myths about affordable, workforce housing that you have had to address?

Guests:
Molly Siegel, Isle au Haut Community Development Corporation
Peter Roth, Island Workforce Housing, Deer Isle-Stonington
Marla O’Byrne, Island Housing Trust, Mount Desert Island

About the host:
Ron Beard is producer and host of Talk of the Towns, which first aired on WERU in 1993 as part of his community building work as an Extension professor with University of Maine Cooperative Extension and Sea Grant. He took all the journalism courses he could fit in while an undergraduate student in wildlife management and served as an intern with Maine Public Television nightly newscast in the early 1970s. Ron is an adjunct faculty member at College of the Atlantic, teaching courses on community development. Ron served on the Bar Harbor Town Council for six years and is currently board chair for the Jesup Memorial Library in Bar Harbor, where he has lived since 1975. Look for him on the Allagash River in June, and whenever he can get away, in the highlands of Scotland where he was fortunate to spend two sabbaticals.

Talk of the Towns 6/9/21: Pine Tree Power—the rationale for a consumer-owned electric utility for Maine

Producer/Host: Ron Beard

Pine Tree Power—the rationale for a consumer-owned electric utility for Maine
] -What led to consideration of a consumer- owned non-profit electric utility for the State of Maine? What is the history of this approach?
-What are the main advantages to this approach?
-What would have to change to make a consumer-owned electric utility possible?
-How is electricity generated and distributed in Maine today? What is the history of investor- owned electric utilities?
-What is the experience for Maine’s consumers of electricity? How do the two major privately owned utilities compare in reliability of service and rates to other rural states?
-The current bill is supported by members of both major political parties… What are the primary reasons for their support?
-In terms of energy conservation and use of renewables to produce electricity, how would a consumer-owned utility be different than the current model?

Guests:
Rep. Nicole Grohoski (Ellsworth/Trenton) and also on Energy Utilities, Technology Committee
Emily Rochford, Unity College, core member Maine Youth for Climate Justice
Louise Chaplin, University of Maine, Executive Board, Coastal Youth Climate Coalition
John Brautigam, Maine Attorney and Public Policy Consultant

About the host:
Ron Beard is producer and host of Talk of the Towns, which first aired on WERU in 1993 as part of his community building work as an Extension professor with University of Maine Cooperative Extension and Sea Grant. He took all the journalism courses he could fit in while an undergraduate student in wildlife management and served as an intern with Maine Public Television nightly newscast in the early 1970s. Ron is an adjunct faculty member at College of the Atlantic, teaching courses on community development. Ron served on the Bar Harbor Town Council for six years and is currently board chair for the Jesup Memorial Library in Bar Harbor, where he has lived since 1975. Look for him on the Allagash River in June, and whenever he can get away, in the highlands of Scotland where he was fortunate to spend two sabbaticals.

Talk of the Towns 5/12/21: “Landscape of Change”

Producer/Host: Ron Beard

Landscape of Change (a collaboration between MDI Historical Society, Schoodic Institute, Acadia National Park, MDI Biological Laboratory, College of the Atlantic and A Climate to Thrive)

-What are we up against in terms of climate change? What are impacts we are already seeing here in Maine? What are the long-term trends?
-What is the story of The Champlain Society (Harvard students of natural history conducted research and kept logbooks from the summers of 1880-1882)?
-What do these logbooks tell us about what they observed and specifically about climate change? What other historical records are available to us to help us understand climate change?
-What are current ways in which first-hand observational data is being encouraged, collected, analyzed? How can maps using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) being used to share this information?
-What results do you hope for… what do you hope people will do with the information they gain from Landscape of Change? What might we learn about the “resilience” we will need to adapt to climate change?

How can listeners learn more and get involved?

Guests:
Catherine Schmidt, Schoodic Institute
Lawson Wulsin, A Climate to Thrive
Raney Bench, Mount Desert Island Historical Society

About the host:
Ron Beard is producer and host of Talk of the Towns, which first aired on WERU in 1993 as part of his community building work as an Extension professor with University of Maine Cooperative Extension and Sea Grant. He took all the journalism courses he could fit in while an undergraduate student in wildlife management and served as an intern with Maine Public Television nightly newscast in the early 1970s. Ron is an adjunct faculty member at College of the Atlantic, teaching courses on community development. Ron served on the Bar Harbor Town Council for six years and is currently board chair for the Jesup Memorial Library in Bar Harbor, where he has lived since 1975. Look for him on the Allagash River in June, and whenever he can get away, in the highlands of Scotland where he was fortunate to spend two sabbaticals.

Talk of the Towns 4/14/21: Reimagining Indigenous-Settler Relations

Producer/Host: Ron Beard

Reimagining Indigenous-Settler Relations through the lens of The Gatherings, published by University of Toronto Press in 2021

What were the intentions for The Gatherings…what difference has participation in The Gatherings made in your life?

What did you learn about how to develop honest, respectful relationships among Natives and Non-Natives who were part of the Gatherings?

What led to the writing of the book? What was the process like?

What do non-Natives need to know about the experience of Natives and “the houseguests from hell” who arrived to colonize North America in the 1600s, including the Doctrine of Discovery.

We are broken… separated from the Earth and from one another as children of the Earth. What lessons from the Gatherings, and the work since, might help us reconnect?
…continued…
Where can listeners learn more to help reimagine Indigenous-Settler Relations?
(including Wabanaki Windows with Donna Loring and Dawnland Signals, with Maria Girouard and Esther Anne—both on WERU

Guests:
Shirley Hager is a retired Associate Extension Professor with the University of Maine. She organized the Gatherings under the auspices of the Center for Vision and Policy. She served as principal author of the book on the Gatherings, working with 13 other Native and non-Native co-authors.

Miigam’agan, Mi’kmaq (MIG A MAW), resident of Esgenoopetitj, Burnt Church Reserve, New Brunswick, her life work has been devoted to revival of Wabanaki Culture, Among other roles, she is Elder in Residence at St. Thomas University in Frederickton, providing support to First Nations students.

Marilyn Keyes Roper lives in Northern Maine on traditional Maliseet land, contributing her skills as Volunteer Administrative Assistant of Aid for Kids and works with Wabanaki people as an ally.

About the host:
Ron Beard is producer and host of Talk of the Towns, which first aired on WERU in 1993 as part of his community building work as an Extension professor with University of Maine Cooperative Extension and Sea Grant. He took all the journalism courses he could fit in while an undergraduate student in wildlife management and served as an intern with Maine Public Television nightly newscast in the early 1970s. Ron is an adjunct faculty member at College of the Atlantic, teaching courses on community development. Ron served on the Bar Harbor Town Council for six years and is currently board chair for the Jesup Memorial Library in Bar Harbor, where he has lived since 1975. Look for him on the Allagash River in June, and whenever he can get away, in the highlands of Scotland where he was fortunate to spend two sabbaticals.

Talk of the Towns 3/10/21: Climate Change at the Local Level

Producer/Host: Ron Beard

In the face of a changing climate, Maine communities are working to help families, businesses and local governments take steps, both to reduce green-house gasses and to adapt to the consequences. Citizens are listening to one another, devising plans and enacting policies that are grounded locally, but connected across the state.

Guests Tony Ferrara, of Climate Action Net on the Blue Hill Peninsula, Martha Dickinson of the Ellsworth Green Action Team, Hank Reisner of the Belfast Climate Crisis Committee, Lawson Wulsin, of A Climate to Thrive, on Mount Desert Island and Ania Wright, from the Maine Climate Council talk about what inspires them and what projects are making a difference locally.

About the host:
Ron Beard is producer and host of Talk of the Towns, which first aired on WERU in 1993 as part of his community building work as an Extension professor with University of Maine Cooperative Extension and Sea Grant. He took all the journalism courses he could fit in while an undergraduate student in wildlife management and served as an intern with Maine Public Television nightly newscast in the early 1970s. Ron is an adjunct faculty member at College of the Atlantic, teaching courses on community development. Ron served on the Bar Harbor Town Council for six years and is currently board chair for the Jesup Memorial Library in Bar Harbor, where he has lived since 1975. Look for him on the Allagash River in June, and whenever he can get away, in the highlands of Scotland where he was fortunate to spend two sabbaticals.

Talk of the Towns 2/10/21: A Valentine to Ruth Moore and her writing

Producer/Host: Ron Beard

Who was Ruth Moore?
-Upbringing and family life on Gotts Island
-Her work, including with Reader’s Digest
-Her novels
-Later life in Bass Harbor
-What contributions did Ruth Moore make to American literature… why does her writing resonate?

Attending to Ruth Moore’s legacy and body of work
-Gary Lawless on his role at Blackberry Books, noting Sandy Phippen’s role as editor of High Clouds Soaring, Storms Driving Low (the letters of Ruth Moore)
-Gordon Bok’s role in republishing Cold as a Dog and the Wind Northeast
-Dean Lunt’s plans to republish Ruth’s novels at Islandport Press

Guests:
Dennis Damon, former State Senator, former board chair, Maine Center for Coastal Fisheries
Muriel Davisson, niece of Ruth Moore, President of Tremont Historical Society
Gary Lawless, poet, Gary Lawless is a poet, co-owner of Gulf of Maine Books in Brunswick and owner of the publishing company Blackberry Books in Nobleboro.
Dean Lunt, born on Frenchboro, owner of Islandport Press, based in Yarmouth
Emily Trask-Eaton, niece of Ruth Moore and executrix of her literary estate, doctor of family medicine in Norridgewalk

About the host:
Ron Beard is producer and host of Talk of the Towns, which first aired on WERU in 1993 as part of his community building work as an Extension professor with University of Maine Cooperative Extension and Sea Grant. He took all the journalism courses he could fit in while an undergraduate student in wildlife management and served as an intern with Maine Public Television nightly newscast in the early 1970s. Ron is an adjunct faculty member at College of the Atlantic, teaching courses on community development. Ron served on the Bar Harbor Town Council for six years and is currently board chair for the Jesup Memorial Library in Bar Harbor, where he has lived since 1975. Look for him on the Allagash River in June, and whenever he can get away, in the highlands of Scotland where he was fortunate to spend two sabbaticals.

Talk of the Towns 1/13/21: Celebrating 30 years of the Waldo County Fund & Maine Community Foundation

Producer/Host: Ron Beard

What were the origins of Maine Community Foundation, its mission and areas of focus
What led to creation of County Funds as a strategy to engage local people both as donors and, with county fund support, as community builders.

How does the county committee concept work in your case… your role with encouraging donors and with identifying non-profit organizations whose work you choose to support.

What is the mission of Waterfall Arts, its current range programs… with stories of program participants and instructors

What are the origins, mission and current programs of Restorative Justice Project, with stories when the RJ approach has made a real difference in the lives of those involved

How do donors and potential grantees make connections with the Waldo County Fund and Maine Community Foundation

Guests:
Mary Leaming – chair of the Waldo County Committee, Unity
Betty Schopmeyer – Waldo County Committee advisor, Searsport, artist
Kim Fleming – Executive Director, Waterfall Arts
Sarah Mattox – program staff, Restorative Justice Project
Leslie Goode – Senior Program Officer, MCF, staffs the Waldo County Committee

About the host:
Ron Beard is producer and host of Talk of the Towns, which first aired on WERU in 1993 as part of his community building work as an Extension professor with University of Maine Cooperative Extension and Sea Grant. He took all the journalism courses he could fit in while an undergraduate student in wildlife management and served as an intern with Maine Public Television nightly newscast in the early 1970s. Ron is an adjunct faculty member at College of the Atlantic, teaching courses on community development. Ron served on the Bar Harbor Town Council for six years and is currently board chair for the Jesup Memorial Library in Bar Harbor, where he has lived since 1975. Look for him on the Allagash River in June, and whenever he can get away, in the highlands of Scotland where he was fortunate to spend two sabbaticals.

Talk of the Towns 12/9/20: The Promise of Midwifery for Maine

Producer/Host: Ron Beard

What is the history of midwifery?

What is the current status of midwifery in Maine? What are the challenges to access to care, especially to women in rural areas… how does midwifery play a role in this?

How does someone become a midwife? ( education and levels of practice)

What are the advantages and challenges of starting an independent private practice.

How are midwives/ midwifery care incorporated into Family Practice Residencies?

What is the student experience, advantages of being a student in Maine and challenges with finding preceptors and meeting practice requirements.

What are the key challenges to unlocking the promise of midwifery for Maine, and your hopes for the future?

Guests:
Cathy Heffernan, Certified Nurse Midwife, Bridgton
Linda Robinson, President, Maine Affiliate American College of Nurse Midwives, Bar Harbor
Kristen Hayward, Certified Nurse Midwife, Owner Anchored Women’s Health, Ellsworth
Angela Ripley, Faculty, Maine-Dartmouth Family Medicine Residency, Augusta
Nakeisha Lindsey, midwifery student , Georgetown University, Bangor

About the host:
Ron Beard is producer and host of Talk of the Towns, which first aired on WERU in 1993 as part of his community building work as an Extension professor with University of Maine Cooperative Extension and Sea Grant. He took all the journalism courses he could fit in while an undergraduate student in wildlife management and served as an intern with Maine Public Television nightly newscast in the early 1970s. Ron is an adjunct faculty member at College of the Atlantic, teaching courses on community development. Ron served on the Bar Harbor Town Council for six years and is currently board chair for the Jesup Memorial Library in Bar Harbor, where he has lived since 1975. Look for him on the Allagash River in June, and whenever he can get away, in the highlands of Scotland where he was fortunate to spend two sabbaticals.