Talk of the Towns 4/14/21: Reimagining Indigenous-Settler Relations

Producer/Host: Ron Beard

Reimagining Indigenous-Settler Relations through the lens of The Gatherings, published by University of Toronto Press in 2021

What were the intentions for The Gatherings…what difference has participation in The Gatherings made in your life?

What did you learn about how to develop honest, respectful relationships among Natives and Non-Natives who were part of the Gatherings?

What led to the writing of the book? What was the process like?

What do non-Natives need to know about the experience of Natives and “the houseguests from hell” who arrived to colonize North America in the 1600s, including the Doctrine of Discovery.

We are broken… separated from the Earth and from one another as children of the Earth. What lessons from the Gatherings, and the work since, might help us reconnect?
…continued…
Where can listeners learn more to help reimagine Indigenous-Settler Relations?
(including Wabanaki Windows with Donna Loring and Dawnland Signals, with Maria Girouard and Esther Anne—both on WERU

Guests:
Shirley Hager is a retired Associate Extension Professor with the University of Maine. She organized the Gatherings under the auspices of the Center for Vision and Policy. She served as principal author of the book on the Gatherings, working with 13 other Native and non-Native co-authors.

Miigam’agan, Mi’kmaq (MIG A MAW), resident of Esgenoopetitj, Burnt Church Reserve, New Brunswick, her life work has been devoted to revival of Wabanaki Culture, Among other roles, she is Elder in Residence at St. Thomas University in Frederickton, providing support to First Nations students.

Marilyn Keyes Roper lives in Northern Maine on traditional Maliseet land, contributing her skills as Volunteer Administrative Assistant of Aid for Kids and works with Wabanaki people as an ally.

About the host:
Ron Beard is producer and host of Talk of the Towns, which first aired on WERU in 1993 as part of his community building work as an Extension professor with University of Maine Cooperative Extension and Sea Grant. He took all the journalism courses he could fit in while an undergraduate student in wildlife management and served as an intern with Maine Public Television nightly newscast in the early 1970s. Ron is an adjunct faculty member at College of the Atlantic, teaching courses on community development. Ron served on the Bar Harbor Town Council for six years and is currently board chair for the Jesup Memorial Library in Bar Harbor, where he has lived since 1975. Look for him on the Allagash River in June, and whenever he can get away, in the highlands of Scotland where he was fortunate to spend two sabbaticals.

Talk of the Towns 3/10/21: Climate Change at the Local Level

Producer/Host: Ron Beard

In the face of a changing climate, Maine communities are working to help families, businesses and local governments take steps, both to reduce green-house gasses and to adapt to the consequences. Citizens are listening to one another, devising plans and enacting policies that are grounded locally, but connected across the state.

Guests Tony Ferrara, of Climate Action Net on the Blue Hill Peninsula, Martha Dickinson of the Ellsworth Green Action Team, Hank Reisner of the Belfast Climate Crisis Committee, Lawson Wulsin, of A Climate to Thrive, on Mount Desert Island and Ania Wright, from the Maine Climate Council talk about what inspires them and what projects are making a difference locally.

About the host:
Ron Beard is producer and host of Talk of the Towns, which first aired on WERU in 1993 as part of his community building work as an Extension professor with University of Maine Cooperative Extension and Sea Grant. He took all the journalism courses he could fit in while an undergraduate student in wildlife management and served as an intern with Maine Public Television nightly newscast in the early 1970s. Ron is an adjunct faculty member at College of the Atlantic, teaching courses on community development. Ron served on the Bar Harbor Town Council for six years and is currently board chair for the Jesup Memorial Library in Bar Harbor, where he has lived since 1975. Look for him on the Allagash River in June, and whenever he can get away, in the highlands of Scotland where he was fortunate to spend two sabbaticals.

Talk of the Towns 2/10/21: A Valentine to Ruth Moore and her writing

Producer/Host: Ron Beard

Who was Ruth Moore?
-Upbringing and family life on Gotts Island
-Her work, including with Reader’s Digest
-Her novels
-Later life in Bass Harbor
-What contributions did Ruth Moore make to American literature… why does her writing resonate?

Attending to Ruth Moore’s legacy and body of work
-Gary Lawless on his role at Blackberry Books, noting Sandy Phippen’s role as editor of High Clouds Soaring, Storms Driving Low (the letters of Ruth Moore)
-Gordon Bok’s role in republishing Cold as a Dog and the Wind Northeast
-Dean Lunt’s plans to republish Ruth’s novels at Islandport Press

Guests:
Dennis Damon, former State Senator, former board chair, Maine Center for Coastal Fisheries
Muriel Davisson, niece of Ruth Moore, President of Tremont Historical Society
Gary Lawless, poet, Gary Lawless is a poet, co-owner of Gulf of Maine Books in Brunswick and owner of the publishing company Blackberry Books in Nobleboro.
Dean Lunt, born on Frenchboro, owner of Islandport Press, based in Yarmouth
Emily Trask-Eaton, niece of Ruth Moore and executrix of her literary estate, doctor of family medicine in Norridgewalk

About the host:
Ron Beard is producer and host of Talk of the Towns, which first aired on WERU in 1993 as part of his community building work as an Extension professor with University of Maine Cooperative Extension and Sea Grant. He took all the journalism courses he could fit in while an undergraduate student in wildlife management and served as an intern with Maine Public Television nightly newscast in the early 1970s. Ron is an adjunct faculty member at College of the Atlantic, teaching courses on community development. Ron served on the Bar Harbor Town Council for six years and is currently board chair for the Jesup Memorial Library in Bar Harbor, where he has lived since 1975. Look for him on the Allagash River in June, and whenever he can get away, in the highlands of Scotland where he was fortunate to spend two sabbaticals.

Talk of the Towns 1/13/21: Celebrating 30 years of the Waldo County Fund & Maine Community Foundation

Producer/Host: Ron Beard

What were the origins of Maine Community Foundation, its mission and areas of focus
What led to creation of County Funds as a strategy to engage local people both as donors and, with county fund support, as community builders.

How does the county committee concept work in your case… your role with encouraging donors and with identifying non-profit organizations whose work you choose to support.

What is the mission of Waterfall Arts, its current range programs… with stories of program participants and instructors

What are the origins, mission and current programs of Restorative Justice Project, with stories when the RJ approach has made a real difference in the lives of those involved

How do donors and potential grantees make connections with the Waldo County Fund and Maine Community Foundation

Guests:
Mary Leaming – chair of the Waldo County Committee, Unity
Betty Schopmeyer – Waldo County Committee advisor, Searsport, artist
Kim Fleming – Executive Director, Waterfall Arts
Sarah Mattox – program staff, Restorative Justice Project
Leslie Goode – Senior Program Officer, MCF, staffs the Waldo County Committee

About the host:
Ron Beard is producer and host of Talk of the Towns, which first aired on WERU in 1993 as part of his community building work as an Extension professor with University of Maine Cooperative Extension and Sea Grant. He took all the journalism courses he could fit in while an undergraduate student in wildlife management and served as an intern with Maine Public Television nightly newscast in the early 1970s. Ron is an adjunct faculty member at College of the Atlantic, teaching courses on community development. Ron served on the Bar Harbor Town Council for six years and is currently board chair for the Jesup Memorial Library in Bar Harbor, where he has lived since 1975. Look for him on the Allagash River in June, and whenever he can get away, in the highlands of Scotland where he was fortunate to spend two sabbaticals.

Talk of the Towns 12/9/20: The Promise of Midwifery for Maine

Producer/Host: Ron Beard

What is the history of midwifery?

What is the current status of midwifery in Maine? What are the challenges to access to care, especially to women in rural areas… how does midwifery play a role in this?

How does someone become a midwife? ( education and levels of practice)

What are the advantages and challenges of starting an independent private practice.

How are midwives/ midwifery care incorporated into Family Practice Residencies?

What is the student experience, advantages of being a student in Maine and challenges with finding preceptors and meeting practice requirements.

What are the key challenges to unlocking the promise of midwifery for Maine, and your hopes for the future?

Guests:
Cathy Heffernan, Certified Nurse Midwife, Bridgton
Linda Robinson, President, Maine Affiliate American College of Nurse Midwives, Bar Harbor
Kristen Hayward, Certified Nurse Midwife, Owner Anchored Women’s Health, Ellsworth
Angela Ripley, Faculty, Maine-Dartmouth Family Medicine Residency, Augusta
Nakeisha Lindsey, midwifery student , Georgetown University, Bangor

About the host:
Ron Beard is producer and host of Talk of the Towns, which first aired on WERU in 1993 as part of his community building work as an Extension professor with University of Maine Cooperative Extension and Sea Grant. He took all the journalism courses he could fit in while an undergraduate student in wildlife management and served as an intern with Maine Public Television nightly newscast in the early 1970s. Ron is an adjunct faculty member at College of the Atlantic, teaching courses on community development. Ron served on the Bar Harbor Town Council for six years and is currently board chair for the Jesup Memorial Library in Bar Harbor, where he has lived since 1975. Look for him on the Allagash River in June, and whenever he can get away, in the highlands of Scotland where he was fortunate to spend two sabbaticals.

Talk of the Towns 11/11/20: Creating a Geopark for Maine

Producer/Host: Ron Beard

What makes the geology of present-day Maine especially compelling to you?
What is a Geopark and how would it work?
What have you been working on in the past year as you have drafted a vision for a Maine Geopark?
Within a geopark, there are geosites (sites of geological importance– provide examples from Damariscotta, Fort Knox and Lubec.
How would creation of a Geopark serve the interests of
Local communities (pride of place, economic opportunity)?
Visitors to the state and localities?
Geologists and students of geology?
If you and your colleagues are successful and we jumped in our time-machine and came back to explore the Maine Geopark in ten years time, what might we see? what might we experience? What new knowledge might have been uncovered?

Guests:
Sarah Hall, Professor of Geology, College of the Atlantic
Sahra Gibson, 2020 graduate, College of the Atlantic
Joe Kelly, Emeritus Professor of Geology, University of Maine
Don Hudson, International Appalachian Trail, Emeritus Director, Chewonki

About the host:
Ron Beard is producer and host of Talk of the Towns, which first aired on WERU in 1993 as part of his community building work as an Extension professor with University of Maine Cooperative Extension and Sea Grant. He took all the journalism courses he could fit in while an undergraduate student in wildlife management and served as an intern with Maine Public Television nightly newscast in the early 1970s. Ron is an adjunct faculty member at College of the Atlantic, teaching courses on community development. Ron served on the Bar Harbor Town Council for six years and is currently board chair for the Jesup Memorial Library in Bar Harbor, where he has lived since 1975. Look for him on the Allagash River in June, and whenever he can get away, in the highlands of Scotland where he was fortunate to spend two sabbaticals.

Talk of the Towns 10/14/20 The History Trust: Connecting historical resources for all time

Producer/Host: Ron Beard

What were the origins of The History Trust… given that there are many local organizations who preserve historical records and objects, why was it important to create a new organization? What about Mount Desert Island and the surrounding communities gave rise to The History Trust? What inspiration does the rich tradition of local land trust hold for local history?

Who are the organizations who have come together voluntarily to create The History Trust… guests share their individual organizations missions and holdings and why they are committed to both their own organizations and to The History Trust? Bruce or others list the other organizations and what they are known for, their rationale for joining…

How does it all work… tell some stories of how the work is beginning to demonstrate the value of your approach? Examples of what current member organizations hold in their keeping and are sharing through The History Trust?

Guests:

Bruce Jacobson, Project Manager, The History Trust
Raney Bench, Mount Desert Island Historical Society
Pauline Angione, Mount Desert Island Historical Society
Helene Tuchman, Tremont Historical Society

About the host:
Ron Beard is producer and host of Talk of the Towns, which first aired on WERU in 1993 as part of his community building work as an Extension professor with University of Maine Cooperative Extension and Sea Grant. He took all the journalism courses he could fit in while an undergraduate student in wildlife management and served as an intern with Maine Public Television nightly newscast in the early 1970s. Ron is an adjunct faculty member at College of the Atlantic, teaching courses on community development. Ron served on the Bar Harbor Town Council for six years and is currently board chair for the Jesup Memorial Library in Bar Harbor, where he has lived since 1975. Look for him on the Allagash River in June, and whenever he can get away, in the highlands of Scotland where he was fortunate to spend two sabbaticals.

Talk of the Towns 9/9/20 The Exiles: A Conversation with Christina Baker Kline about her novel

Producer/Host: Ron Beard

The Exiles: A Conversation with Christina Baker Kline about her novel, published in by William Morrow, August, 2020

-Who are the major characters in The Exiles, and how do their lives intertwine?
-What in your own background or previous writing/research intrigued you about aboriginal peoples and the notion that they have often been made exiles of their own land, displaced?
-Speak briefly about the three strands that prepared you, unknowingly, for writing this novel (your own time in Australia, interviewing mothers and daughters, and teaching women in prison)
-In the light of the decolonization movement and Black Lives Matter, their act of “adoption” is revealed as part of the enormous underlying racism that we confront today… and which you confronted in your earlier novel, Orphan Train.
-Talk about your research to prepare you to write The Exiles

About the host:
Ron Beard is producer and host of Talk of the Towns, which first aired on WERU in 1993 as part of his community building work as an Extension professor with University of Maine Cooperative Extension and Sea Grant. He took all the journalism courses he could fit in while an undergraduate student in wildlife management and served as an intern with Maine Public Television nightly newscast in the early 1970s. Ron is an adjunct faculty member at College of the Atlantic, teaching courses on community development. Ron served on the Bar Harbor Town Council for six years and is currently board chair for the Jesup Memorial Library in Bar Harbor, where he has lived since 1975. Look for him on the Allagash River in June, and whenever he can get away, in the highlands of Scotland where he was fortunate to spend two sabbaticals.