Archives for The Nature of Phenology

The Nature of Phenology 9/15/18

Producers/Hosts: Hazel Stark and Joe Horn

The Moose Rut

Photos, a full transcript, references, contact information, and more available at thenatureofphenology.wordpress.com

Here in Maine, the peak of moose rut is at the beginning of October, but individuals may begin displaying some rut behaviors towards the beginning of September. Spoiler alert: if you’re one of those people who think of moose as resplendent, calm animals full of gawky charm and patience, what I’m about to tell you about what they’re up to right now might spoil your adoring impression of them.

The Nature of Phenology 9/8/18

Producers/Hosts: Hazel Stark and Joe Horn

Cluster Flies

Photos, a full transcript, references, contact information, and more available at thenatureofphenology.wordpress.com

Cluster flies are a non-native member of the blow fly family who, contrary to their persistence indoors, will not actually reproduce in home or office, but rather are simply looking for a warm sunny window upon which they can persist through the cold winter months of the New World. They are larger than houseflies, hairier, slower, much less coordinated in flight, and of course amass in their iconic numbers. In fact, cluster flies are their very own species called Pollenia rudis and they certainly are the rudest guests I have ever hosted!

The Nature of Phenology 9/1/18

Producers/Hosts: Hazel Stark and Joe Horn

Northern Flickers

Photos, a full transcript, references, contact information, and more available at thenatureofphenology.wordpress.com

Flickers are the nonconformists of the woodpecker world. While they share some characteristics with our other local woodpeckers, such as long bills and tongues with barbed tips for accessing hard-to-reach prey, a preference for nesting in cavities, and the classic woodpecker flying habit of making a few heavy wing flaps, gliding and falling a bit, then flapping heavily again, flickers do their thing a little differently.