Archives for The Nature of Phenology

The Nature of Phenology 8/8/20: Hermit Thrush Songs

Producers: Hazel Stark & Joe Horn
Host: Hazel Stark

There truly are no words to capture the beauty and purity of this bird’s song. The notes are crisp yet wavering, sad and reflective yet untroubled. This song captures and conveys human feeling and human emotion across a barrier of fur and feather, beak and lips.

Photos, a full transcript, references, contact information, and more available at thenatureofphenology.wordpress.com.

The Nature of Phenology 8/1/20: Sea Lavender

Producers: Hazel Stark & Joe Horn
Host: Hazel Stark

At high tide, this flowering plant is often submerged in saltwater, light purple blossoms swaying beneath the green sea. Sea lavender’s juicy, thick leaves have an important role in this task: they are specialized to be able to pump salt out of their tissues.

Photos, a full transcript, references, contact information, and more available at thenatureofphenology.wordpress.com.

The Nature of Phenology 7/25/20: Wild Maine Blueberries

Producers: Hazel Stark & Joe Horn
Host: Hazel Stark

I’ve often heard it said that the wildness of lowbush blueberries make them far superior to highbush blueberries. But in truth, our lowbush blueberries are actually a diverse collection of species, and our highbush blueberries are as wildly Maine as pine trees and lobster.

Photos, a full transcript, references, contact information, and more available at thenatureofphenology.wordpress.com.

The Nature of Phenology 7/18/20: Deer Flies

Producers: Hazel Stark & Joe Horn
Host: Hazel Stark

Deer flies lay their eggs in or around water where they will hatch and the young larvae will grow up eating decomposing organic matter. When they emerge as adults the males tend to feast exclusively on fruit and nectar, but the females—compelled by the increased metabolic demands of motherhood—look for energy dense food in the form of blood, and fresh blood at that.

Photos, a full transcript, references, contact information, and more available at thenatureofphenology.wordpress.com

The Nature of Phenology 7/11/20: Evening Primrose

Producers: Hazel Stark & Joe Horn
Host: Hazel Stark

Because evening primrose grows in places we usually associate with non-native weeds, it is a plant that is often overlooked. But this native biennial is one of our many local treasures that should be appreciated wherever you find it.

Photos, a full transcript, references, contact information, and more available at thenatureofphenology.wordpress.com

The Nature of Phenology 7/4/20: Loons

Producers: Hazel Stark & Joe Horn
Host: Hazel Stark

Loon chicks are hatching now, so your lake explorations might be rewarded with the sight of a fluffy, charcoal gray loon chick riding its swimming parent’s back. While loons have had millions of years to adapt to life on and in the water, they have not had as long to adapt to the loud noises of fireworks.

Photos, a full transcript, references, contact information, and more available at thenatureofphenology.wordpress.com.

The Nature of Phenology 6/27/20: Mayflies

Producers: Hazel Stark & Joe Horn
Host: Hazel Stark

Mayflies are aquatic insects belonging to the scientific order of Ephemeroptera, derived from ephemeral, or short-lasting. They are insects of fresh water, and while they are most often seen as elegant winged adults, they spend most of their lives in their nymph stage crawling along the bottom of these water bodies feeding on decomposing leaves and vegetation.

Photos, a full transcript, references, contact information, and more available at thenatureofphenology.wordpress.com

The Nature of Phenology 6/20/20: Blue Flag Iris

Producers: Hazel Stark & Joe Horn
Host: Hazel Stark

Blue flag irises are actually a collection of species native all over the continental United States, Alaska, and Canada with the exception of the desert southwest. Even here in Maine, what is typically called blue flag iris is actually a couple of species such as Iris versicolor and the ever so rare Iris prismatica. Our blue flag irises are plants of wet places, so are often found in soggy patches of meadows and fields, marshes, swamps, ditches, and shorelines.

Photos, a full transcript, references, contact information, and more available at thenatureofphenology.wordpress.com