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  • WERU News Report 8/6/13

    Producer/Host: Amy Browne

    On this anniversary of the US atomic bombing of Hiroshima, another nuclear crisis is escalating in Japan, this time at Fukushima. Today we bring you part 1 of a 2-part special, with all the latest news on the crisis.

    Arnie Gundersen, a nuclear expert, and former high-level nuclear industry executive, now with Fairewinds Energy Education, described several areas of serious concern at Fukushima in the recent film Forty Good Years and One Bad Day (excerpt aired with permission) FMI: fairewinds.org

    Long-time Maine activist Nancy Allen has joined with others in a group that is compiling, verifying and distributing information at www.simplyinfo.org Her concern about the current crisis can be traced back through the years to her childhood, and Hiroshima:

    Monday afternoon we spoke with Dean Wilkie, one of the founders of simplyinfo.org. He has three decades of experience in the nuclear field through his work at a Department of Energy test reactor in Idaho, working in reactor operations, management, construction and plant engineering

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    Published on August 6, 2013 · Filed under: WERU News Report; Tagged as: , ,
    8 Comments

8 Responses to “WERU News Report 8/6/13”

  1. [...] Part 1 Audio can be found at the WERU archive (play button is below the social media links, look for the small play arrow) [...]

  2. […] WERU’s News Report interviews Dean Wilkie, nuclear reactor operations at a U.S. Department of Energy test reactor in Idaho (At 28:50 in) – When the accident happened back in March 2011 there was a power pole, one of these huge power poles, inside of the Daiichi facility, inside the area there, and the ground that it was set on became super-saturated with water and they had a mud slide and that whole tower went down […] At Fukushima now, what we’re seeing, all of this work that they’ve been doing with these walls and then it’s causing the water to back up, it’s starting to saturate soil that’s underneath the buildings and in adjacent areas around the buildings. Couple that with the fact that there are known fractures in that soil — it was very obvious during the earthquake.  Full broadcast here […]

  3. […] archives.weru.org/weru-news-report/2013/08/weru-news-report-8613/ […]

  4. […] WERU’s News Report interviews Dean Wilkie, nuclear reactor operations at a U.S. Department of Energy test reactor in Idaho (At 28:50 in) – When the accident happened back in March 2011 there was a power pole, one of these huge power poles, inside of the Daiichi facility, inside the area there, and the ground that it was set on became super-saturated with water and they had a mud slide and that whole tower went down […] At Fukushima now, what we’re seeing, all of this work that they’ve been doing with these walls and then it’s causing the water to back up, it’s starting to saturate soil that’s underneath the buildings and in adjacent areas around the buildings. Couple that with the fact that there are known fractures in that soil — it was very obvious during the earthquake.  Full broadcast here […]

  5. […] WERU’s News Report interviews Dean Wilkie, nuclear reactor operations at a U.S. Department of Energy test reactor in Idaho (At 28:50 in) – When the accident happened back in March 2011 there was a power pole, one of these huge power poles, inside of the Daiichi facility, inside the area there, and the ground that it was set on became super-saturated with water and they had a mud slide and that whole tower went down […] At Fukushima now, what we’re seeing, all of this work that they’ve been doing with these walls and then it’s causing the water to back up, it’s starting to saturate soil that’s underneath the buildings and in adjacent areas around the buildings. Couple that with the fact that there are known fractures in that soil — it was very obvious during the earthquake.  Full broadcast here […]

  6. […] WERU’s News Report interviews Dean Wilkie, nuclear reactor operations at a U.S. Department of Energy test reactor in Idaho (At 28:50 in) – When the accident happened back in March 2011 there was a power pole, one of these huge power poles, inside of the Daiichi facility, inside the area there, and the ground that it was set on became super-saturated with water and they had a mud slide and that whole tower went down […] At Fukushima now, what we’re seeing, all of this work that they’ve been doing with these walls and then it’s causing the water to back up, it’s starting to saturate soil that’s underneath the buildings and in adjacent areas around the buildings. Couple that with the fact that there are known fractures in that soil — it was very obvious during the earthquake.  Full broadcast here […]

  7. […] WERU’s News Report interviews Dean Wilkie, nuclear reactor operations at a U.S. Department of Energy test reactor in Idaho (At 28:50 in) – When the accident happened back in March 2011 there was a power pole, one of these huge power poles, inside of the Daiichi facility, inside the area there, and the ground that it was set on became super-saturated with water and they had a mud slide and that whole tower went down […] At Fukushima now, what we’re seeing, all of this work that they’ve been doing with these walls and then it’s causing the water to back up, it’s starting to saturate soil that’s underneath the buildings and in adjacent areas around the buildings. Couple that with the fact that there are known fractures in that soil — it was very obvious during the earthquake. Full broadcast here. […]

  8. […] WERU’s News Report interviews Dean Wilkie, nuclear reactor operations at a U.S. Department of Energy test reactor in Idaho (At 28:50 in) – When the accident happened back in March 2011 there was a power pole, one of these huge power poles, inside of the Daiichi facility, inside the area there, and the ground that it was set on became super-saturated with water and they had a mud slide and that whole tower went down […] At Fukushima now, what we’re seeing, all of this work that they’ve been doing with these walls and then it’s causing the water to back up, it’s starting to saturate soil that’s underneath the buildings and in adjacent areas around the buildings. Couple that with the fact that there are known fractures in that soil — it was very obvious during the earthquake. Full broadcast here. […]

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