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WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives

Audio archives of spoken word broadcasts from Community Radio WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill (weru.org)

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  • Producer/Host: Jim Campbell

    “Hear Again” from the WERU Archives in honor of our 20th anniversary

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  • Producer/Host: Amy Browne

    Topic: How Mainers are coping with economic crisis: The story of the Witch in the Woods

    Guests: Becka Gagne & Marianne Adamenas

    To contact “The Witch in the Woods”: 416 Old County Rd, Knox, ME 04986

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  • Producer/Host: Amy Browne

    Audio contributed by: Meredith DeFrancesco, Eric Olson, Jim Harney

    Music from School of the Americas Annual Protest at Ft. Benning, GA

    Today we pay tribute to Bangor resident—and world citizen—Jim Harney, who died on December 26th at age 68.

    Harney was former Catholic priest, and one of the Milwaukee 14, a group of priests and faith-based peace activists who broke into draft boards and burned about 10,000 Selective Service records with homemade napalm in a protest against the Vietnam War in 1968.  They read from the gospel while the records burned.  He spent more than a year in jail for his part in that protest.

    In recent years many of us knew Jim Harney through the faces and voices of others that he shared through his photographs and stories.  The photographs of people he met in Iraq have adorned pins and posters, putting a real face on war.  Jim traveled extensively in Latin America, interviewing and photographing people whose stories might not otherwise be told— the poor, survivors of systemic economic violence, those struggling for change.  He accompanied them on their journeys–  running with his friends in El Salvador as US bombs rained down on them, sleeping in the mud in the corn fields, crossing the desert with the undocumented.

    After learning he had terminal cancer,  Harney planned a walk  from Boston to Washington DC last summer, to call attention to the plight of the undocumented.  He was able to make it as far as Rhode Island.

    In December 2008, Jim Harney was given the Sacco & Vanzetti Social Justice Award from Community Church of Boston— an award that over it’s more than 30 year history has also been presented to Howard Zinn, Scott and Helen Nearing, Cesar Chavez and Rachel Corie.

    FMI: www.posibilidad.org, celebratingjim.net/, www.soaw.org

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  • Producer/Host: Amy Browne

    Audio recorded by: Adam Lacher

    The 4th– and final– segment of excerpts from the testimony at the Maine Citizen Trade Policy Commission’s recent public hearing in Bangor.  The commission was established by Maine’s legislature in 2004 to assess and monitor the legal and economic impacts of trade agreements on state and local laws, working conditions, and the business environment in Maine, and to provide a mechanism for citizens and legislators to voice their concerns and recommendations to our Congressional Delegation.  It was the first of its kind in the country and has served as a model for other states.  The board is made up of representatives of various stakeholders.  U.S. Congressman Michael Michaud attended the hearing.  Senators Snowe and Collins sent representatives.
    This is testimony offered by our neighbors, describing the impact of “Free” Trade agreements on Maine communities and communities elsewhere, including our Sister Communities in El Salvador.  Also included in today’s segment are Representative Mike Michaud’s remarks at the hearing, focusing on his proposed Trade Act legislation.

    The commission is accepting written comments, which may be submitted to:  Linda Nickerson,  Bureau of Labor Standards, 45 State House Station, Augusta, ME  or Linda.B.Nickerson@maine.gov
    FMI about Congressman Michaud’s proposed Trade Act Bill:  www.michaud.house.gov/

    NOTE: Part 1 aired on Weekend Voices on 12/20/08, Part 2 aired on Voices on 12/23/08 and part 3 aired on Weekend Voices on 12/27/08.  Listen/download at www.weru.org

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  • Producer/Host: Amy Browne

    Audio Recorded by Adam Lacher

    Part 3 of the testimony at the Maine Citizen Trade Policy Commission’s recent public hearing in Bangor, Maine.  The commission was established by Maine’s legislature in 2004 to assess and monitor the legal and economic impacts of trade agreements on state and local laws, working conditions, and the business environment in Maine, and to provide a mechanism for citizens and legislators to voice their concerns and recommendations to our Congressional Delegation.  It was the first of it’s kind in the country and has served as a model for other states.  The board is made up of representatives of various stakeholders.  U.S. Congressman Michael Michaud attended the hearing.  Senators Snowe and Collins sent representatives.

    This is the 2nd hour of testimony offered by our neighbors, describing the impact of “Free” Trade agreements on Maine communities and communities elsewhere, including our Sister Communities in El Salvador.  Part 1 aired on Weekend Voices on 12/20/08, and Part 2 aired on Voices on 12/23/08.  We will air the final segment on Voices on Tuesday, 12/30/08 at 4p.m.

    Written comments may be submitted to:  Linda Nickerson,  Bureau of Labor Standards, 45 State House Station, Augusta, ME  or Linda.B.Nickerson@maine.gov

    FMI about Congressman Michaud’s proposed Trade Act Bill:  www.michaud.house.gov/

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  • Producer/Host: Amy Browne

    Audio Recorded by Adam Lacher

    Part 2 of the testimony at the Maine Citizen Trade Policy Commission’s recent public hearing in Bangor, Maine.  The commission was established by Maine’s legislature in 2004 to assess and monitor the legal and economic impacts of trade agreements on state and local laws, working conditions, and the business environment in Maine, and to provide a mechanism for citizens and legislators to voice their concerns and recommendations to our Congressional Delegation.  It was the first of it’s kind in the country and has served as a model for other states.  The board is made up of representatives of various stakeholders.  U.S. Congressman Michael Michaud attended the hearing.  Senators Snowe and Collins sent representatives.

    This is the 2nd hour of testimony offered by our neighbors, describing the impact of “Free” Trade agreements on Maine communities and communities elsewhere, including our Sister Communities in El Salvador.  Part 1 aired on Weekend Voices on 12/20/08. We will air more of the testimony on Weekend Voices next Saturday, 12/27/08 at 3p.m., and the final segment on Voices on Tuesday, 12/30/08 at 4p.m.

    Written comments may be submitted to:  Linda Nickerson,  Bureau of Labor Standards, 45 State House Station, Augusta, ME  or Linda.B.Nickerson@maine.gov

    FMI about Congressman Michaud’s proposed Trade Act Bill:  www.michaud.house.gov/

    Correction: The intro says “Weekend Voices”, but this is “Voices”

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  • Producer/Host: Amy Browne

    Audio Recorded by Adam Lacher

    Part 1 of the testimony at the Maine Citizen Trade Policy Commission’s recent public hearing in Bangor, Maine.  The commission was established by Maine’s legislature in 2004 to assess and monitor the legal and economic impacts of trade agreements on state and local laws, working conditions, and the business environment in Maine, and to provide a mechanism for citizens and legislators to voice their concerns and recommendations to our Congressional Delegation.  It was the first of it’s kind in the country and has served as a model for other states.  The board is made up of representatives of various stakeholders.  U.S. Congressman Michael Michaud attended the hearing.  Senators Snowe and Collins sent representatives.

    This is the first hour of testimony offered by our neighbors, describing the impact of “Free” Trade agreements on Maine communities and communities elsewhere, including our Sister Communities in El Salvador.  We will air more of the testimony on Voices on Tuesday, 12/23/08 at 4p.m. and on Weekend Voices next Saturday, 12/27/08 at 3p.m.

    Written comments may be submitted to:  Linda Nickerson,  Bureau of Labor Standards, 45 State House Station, Augusta, ME  or Linda.B.Nickerson@maine.gov

    FMI about Congressman Michaud’s proposed Trade Act Bill:  www.michaud.house.gov/

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  • Producer/Host: Amy Browne

    The stage is set in El Salvador for the FMLN party to defeat the right wing ARENA party in the upcoming elections. The groups that eventually became the FMLN and ARENA parties, fought on opposite sides in the war in El Salvador in the 1980s.  The right had ties to the small number of wealthy families that had long controlled the country, and included paramilitaries who committed widespread massacres and other crimes against humanity, and assassinated Archbishop Romero. They received funding from the U.S. government, which labeled the uprising of the poor rural people against that right wing regime “communism”.
    Since the peace accords that ended the war nearly 17 years ago, former paramilitaries—who have gone unpunished—-have been active in the right-wing ARENA party, and many of those involved in the people’s uprising are associated with FMLN.
    The ARENA party has been in office and has had a close relationship with the Bush regime.  Now that polls indicate that the FMLN will likely win in next year’s elections, many in El Salvador believe that the U.S. will go to great lengths to prevent that from happening.
    We spoke by phone yesterday to a community organizer in El Salvador, and a member of the Sister Cities organization that helps coordinate WERU’s relationship with our sister station Radio Sumpul, as well as the sistering relationships between Maine Organic Farmers and Gardener’s Assoc and the rural communities of El Salvador, and PICA and Bangor’s Sister City relationship with Carasque.

    Guests: Bernardo Belloso is a National Directive Council Member of the Association of Rural Communities for the Development of El Salvador,CRIPDES*.* CRIPDES is the largest rural grassroots movement in El Salvador which coordinates the organizing, education and mobilization of over 300 rural communities spread through seven provinces of El Salvador
    Michelle Anderson is the Co-Coordinator for the U.S.-El Salvador Sister Cities network, linking 16 cities across the U.S. as a movement in solidarity with the Salvadoran organized communities.  In this interview Michelle is translating Bernado’s comments to English

    FMI: www.elsalvadorsolidarity.org

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