Home - WERU FM 89.9 Community Radio, Blue Hill, Maine

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives

Audio archives of spoken word broadcasts from Community Radio WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill (weru.org)

Donate to WERU Donate Now

Archives

E-mail Notifications

Get an e-mail when we update our archives (several times a week)
Enter your Email
Powered by FeedBlitz
  • Producer/Host: Meredith DeFrancesco

    Issue: Environmental and Social Justice

    Program Topic: Fraud and Repression in Honduran Elections; Fast Food Wages Rally

    Key Discussion Points:

    a) We look at Hondurans elections, rife with numerous instances of election fraud recorded by election observers. Despite this the European Union and the U.S. Have verified the oficial results, in favor of the National Party, the party behind the coup and who was declared the winner of the following elections.
    b) Violence against social movement activists and journalist has been continuous since the 2009 military coup, and intensified against supporters of the LIBRE party preceding the elections, including at least 18 killed in the past year.
    c) Today, fast food workers in 100 cities are walking off the job in a one day strike for higher wages. Supporting rallies were expected in close to 100 more cities, including Ellsworth.

    Guests:
    A) Grahame Russel, director of Rights Action, www.rightsaction.org/
    B) demonstrators at Ellsworth rally for increased wages at fast food restaurants, including members of the Ellsworth Community Union. www.facebook.com/communityunionofellsworth

    Additional links:
    therealnews.com/t2/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=31&Itemid=74&jumival=11164&updaterx=2013-12-08+15%3A13%3A10
    upsidedownworld.org/main/honduras-archives-46/4584-the-results-of-the-elections-in-honduras-were-changed-says-european-union-observer-
    upsidedownworld.org/main/honduras-archives-46/4590-honduras-beyond-the-eye-of-the-electoral-storm
    upsidedownworld.org/main/honduras-archives-46/4580-the-different-souls-of-the-libre-party-and-repression-against-honduran-students
    www.ips-dc.org/reports/fast-food_ceos_rake_in_taxpayer-subsidized_pay
    www.reuters.com/article/2013/12/05/us-usa-employment-fastfood-idUSBRE9B40WW20131205
    www.usatoday.com/story/money/business/2013/12/05/fast-food-strike-wages/3877023/
    www.thenation.com/blog/177451/fast-food-strikes-hit-100-cities-thursday#
    upsidedownworld.org/main/honduras-archives-46/4601-international-election-monitors-in-honduras-do-they-ensure-clean-elections-or-whitewash-fraud

    No Comments
  • Producer/Host: Meredith DeFrancesco

    Issue: Environmental and Social Justice

    Program Topic: The 19th Conference of Parties(COP) to the United Nation’s Framework Convention on Climate Change conclusion and analysis

    Key Discussion Points:

    a) The UN climate talks in Warsaw were meant to build towards a goal of a binding agreement in 2015, but even this modest directive has disintegrated. Today, established environmental groups and other social movement representatives walked out of the COP 19, saying they felt not enough was being done. They say they will focus on building a movement to pressure on governments for the next conference.
    b) Main areas to be addressed at the climate talks are the mitigation of climate change, adaption to the increasing extreme weather effects and funding for countries who are the hardest hit, the least able to afford it, and have had the least contribution to carbon dioxide levels. On Wednesday, members of the G77 and China temporarily walked out negotiations on “loss and damages”, responding to the lack of engagement by developed countries, who want to put off the issue until 2015.
    c) With all the current carbon dioxide emissions reduction goals submitted by party countries, there is still a projected mitigation gap of 8-13 gigatonnes of carbon dioxide. To hold the planet to 2 degree Celsius, CO 2 emissions can’t exceed 44 gigatonnes by 2020. With the current party goals, the planet will be at 52-58 gigatonnes at 2020.

    Guest:
    A) Janet Redman, the Institute for Policy Studies, director of the Climate Policy Program.

    www.ips-dc.org/
    www.theguardian.com/environment/2013/nov/21/mass-walk-out-un-climate-talks-warsaw
    www.theguardian.com/global-development/2013/nov/20/climate-talks-walk-out-compensation-un-warsaw
    climate-connections.org/
    allafrica.com/stories/201311210409.html
    allafrica.com/stories/201311210463.html
    www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/20/climate-change-fight

    No Comments
  • Producer/Host: Meredith DeFrancesco

    Issue: Environmental and Social Justice

    Program Topic: Climate Change and Increasing Storm Intensity

    Key Discussion Points:
    a) As the 19th round of UN climate talks open in Poland and the Philippines reels from Typhoon Haiyan, climate scientist with the National Center for Atmospheric Research, Kevin Trenberth, talks about how global climate change effects the intensity of extreme weather, like typhoons.
    b) Trenberth discusses the science behind how rising temperatures and rising sea levels effects the severity of storms, how carbon outputs effect ocean acidification,
    c)and some of the recommendations for mitigation outlined in a recent report by Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

    Guest:
    Kevin Trenberth, climate scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, member of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

    No Comments
  • Producer/Host: Meredith DeFrancesco

    Issue: Environmental and Social Justice

    Program Topic: Penobscot Nation Natural Resources director on the work to protect the health of the Penobscot River Watershed

    Key Discussion Points:

    a) Today we hear a talk by John Banks, a member of the Penobscot Nation and the Natural Resources Director for the tribe. He has been an active and tireless advocate for environmental sustainability and tribal rights.
    b) In his talk, he outlines the Penobscot Nation’s work to protect the health of the Penobscot River Watershed from the impacts of paper mill dioxin, to the work of the Penobscot River Restoration Project to dismantle dams, allowing for the expansion of fish species into original habitats, to legal issues on state vs federal control over pollution permits, with explicit industry pressure, and now the tribes current court case to oppose the 2012 state Attorney General’s opinion that the Penobscot Reservation does not include any of the Penobscot River.

    c) John Banks spoke at the University of Maine’s 10th annual Eco-Peace Sustainability Training and International Affiliates Conference on October 25th in Belfast. This years Conference was titled “Reclaiming the Commons : Water Ethics and Nature Rights in Maine”. We spoke with organizer Hugh Curran on RadioActive October 10th, 2013.

    Guest:

    A) John Banks, Natural Resources Director for the Penobscot Nation; Penobscot tribal member

    No Comments
  • Producer/Host: Meredith DeFrancesco

    Issue: Environmental and Social Justice

    Program Topic: Potential Tar Sands Pipeline and Waterfront Protection Ordinance in South Portland

    Key Discussion Points:

    a) On November 5th voters in South Portland will weigh in on proposed “Waterfront Protection Ordinance”.
    b) The underlying motivation for it’s crafting is an attempt to stop a potential reversal of the Portland Montreal Pipeline to carry tar sands oil from Montreal to South Portland for export, linking to the Energy East tar sands pipeline project in Canada.
    c) Portland Pipeline Corporation denies plans to reverse the pipeline at this time, and says the Waterfront Protection Ordinance will harm industry in South Portland.

    Guests:

    A) Sarah LaChance, 350 Maine

    B)Jim Merril, Bernstein Shur Group, New Hampshire State Director (www.thebernsteinshurgroup.com/), spokesperson for Working Waterfront Coalition and Portland Pipeline Corporation (www.pmpl.com)

    C)Bob Klotz, 350 Maine (350maine.org)

    No Comments
  • Producer/Host: Meredith DeFrancesco

    Issue: Environmental and Social Justice

    Program Topic: Medicaid Loophole in ACA, Maine

    Key Discussion Points:

    a) Despite the Affordable Care Act’s original design to have coverage in the US, the courts granted states the right to opt out of the Medicaid expansion portion of the law, which would provide subsidies for those who could not afford it. In the first 3 years, the federal government would pay 100% of the program, and after that 90%. 26 states, including Maine have opted out. Though Maine’s legislature approved the Medicaid expansion, LePage vetoed it, forcing the opt out.
    b) On January 1st, 70,000 Mainers will lose or be denied access to healthcare through Medicaid. 24, 000 will lose MaineCare through state cuts and an additional 45,000 who would have been covered by the ACA’s Mediciad expansion will be left without coverage.
    c) We also look at yesterday’s unveiling by LePage’s Offcie of policy and Management proposal to make over $30 million in state cuts, including to Head Start and General Assistance, and at House Republican leader, Rep. Fredette’s two bills that would reform Maine’s Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program.

    Guest:
    A) Christine Hastedt, Maine Equal Justice Partners, (www.mejp.org)

    No Comments
  • Producer/Host: Meredith DeFrancesco

    Issue: Environmental and Social Justice

    Program Topic: Organic Seed Growers and Trade Association et al vs. Monsanto; Maine’s GMO labeling bill

    Key Discussion Points:
    a) On March 29th, 2011 OSGATA, et al vs. Monsanto was filed in federal district court. 60 family farms, seed businesses and agricultural organizations were seeking protection from Monsanto’s heavy handed tactics of investigating and suing farmers for patent right infringement, if they claimed their genetically modified seeds had spread to the fields of farmers who had not purchased the GE seed.
    b) In January 2012, the case was dismissed. This June, the US Court of Appeals First Circuit found that the plaintiffs did have standing, but that the case could not go forth, “because Monsanto has made binding assurances that it will ‘not take legal action against growers whose crops might inadvertently contain traces of Monsanto’s biotech genes (because, for example, some transgenic seed or pollen blew onto the grower’s land’”. OSGATA, et al, still looks for their day in court. They have asked the Supreme Court to review the Court of Appeals’ decision.
    c) Jim Gerritsen also discusses Maine’s GMO labeling bill, poised to take effect.

    Guest:
    Jim Gerritsen, president of the Organic Seed Growers and Trade Association; Co-owner and operator of Wood Prairie Farm in Bridgewater, Maine

    www.osgata.org/
    archive.constantcontact.com/fs122/1104248386985/archive/1113747008645.html
    www.pubpat.org/assets/files/seed/OrganicSeedSCTPetition.pdf
    www.woodprairie.com/

    No Comments
  • Producer/Host: Meredith DeFrancesco

    Issue: Environmental and Social Justice

    Key Discussion Points:
    a) This week thousands of fast food workers across the US went on strike for better wages, calling for a $15 per an hour wage and the right to unionize. The Fast Food Forward campaign began in NYC and has spread across the country. Fast food workers also went on strike in NYC this past November and April,
    b) In June, The Left Forum in NYC hosted a panel titled “Foundations of Economic Justice: Low Wage Workers Forward”. It was organized, moderated and recorded by Richard Hill of WPKEN, Bridgeport, CT and Between the Lines producer Scott Harris.
    (www.btlonline.org)
    c) Two of the panelist were current KFC workers. They gave their perspectives as fast food workers active in a movement for better wages. Two other panelists gave academic analysis on the current state of an economy based on low wage workers.

    Guests:
    A) Michael Zweig, professor of Economics at Stony Brook University; director of the Center for the Study of Working Class Life; author of book The Working Class Majority (Cornell).
    B) Shanita Simon, KFC worker; NY Communities for Change
    www.nycommunities.org/
    C) Catherine Ruetschlin, policy analyst at Demos; author of November, 2012 report: Retail’s Hidden Potential — How Raising Wages Would Benefit Workers, the Industry and the Overall Economy
    www.demos.org/sites/default/files/publications/RetailsHiddenPotential_Demos.pdf
    www.demos.org/about-demos
    D)Joseph Barrera, KFC worker; New York Communities for Change

    www.btlonline.org/leftforumcoop.html
    www.theguardian.com/world/2013/jul/29/fast-food-workers-strike-wages

    No Comments